Backyard Birds of Pennsylvania (With Pictures)

Virginia is a beautiful place known for its natural beauty filled with rivers and mountains. What does a bird enthusiast think about such a place? He naturally wonders about the different kinds of birds there.

In such places with so many different types of landscapes, we are sure to find multiple types of birds also.

There are so many exciting things that are associated with birds – their appearance, the places they are found in, ways to bring them into our own backyard, identifying them, etc.

If you are curious about what birds are seen here, then, this is the right article for you. Read on for some interesting information about the splendid birds that make Pennsylvania their home.

There are 432 Birds with 3 Categories

If you are wondering if you read the number of birds right, then you did. There are as many as 432 birds that can actually be broadly grouped into 3 divisions. This article deals with a potpourri of birds that are discussed according to the season that they are spotted in. Read on till the end to know more.

What are the divisions we are going to make based on the seasons? Here they are:

  • Year-round Resident birds
  • Birds of Spring, Summer, and Early Fall
  • Fall and Winter Birds

Year-Round Resident Birds of Pennsylvania

Though some birds are known to cleverly avoid winters by migrating, there are other birds that prefer to stay on where they are permanent. They do not think of moving in any season. This is a delight to bird watchers for they can admire these birds any time of the year without any restrictions. With sound knowledge about how to attract these birds to our houses, we could actually admire them at very close quarters also. If you are in Pennsylvania, these are the birds that you can always look out for. Yes, you can look for them through the year to your heart’s content.

  • White-throated Sparrow
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • American Robin
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Mourning Dove

White-throated Sparrow – Zonotrichia albicollis

Color and Markings: 

As the name indicates, this bird has pure white only in the throat. The main color of the bird is brown which is seen on the wings and in the tail. There is some white in other parts of the body like the shoulders, breast, and underbelly. However, the white in the underbelly and breast is mixed with grey. The feathers, which are brown, end in black making them look beautiful.

The main color of the face is grey. The birds have bills that are not long and are silver in color. The additional yellow marking on the bill is attractive. There are two white areas on the face – the chin and a characteristic white mark that resembles an eyebrow. This reaches up to the bill.

Right on top of the head, this bird has black and white. In fact, the head is actually black in color. It has white stripes running across it. The white stripe that is in the middle extends all the way through the center of the face. The ‘Tan Striped” swallow also has a similar pattern, but the black is replaced by brown.

Size: 

This bird is about 6.3 to 7.1 inches long. The wingspan is around 7.9 to 9.1 inches.

Habitat:

The habitat of these birds is varied and they can live in different areas like the periphery of forests, near water bodies, or also in areas that are filled with greenery like thickets and shrubs.

Diet: 

These birds, by nature, are used to searching for food on the ground. So, when you fill your feeder with the food they like, it is a good idea to leave some on the ground also for them. They love to eat black oil sunflower seeds and millet and this will draw them into your backyard.

Tufted Titmouse – Baeolophus bicolor

Coloration and Markings: 

This gorgeous bird has two basic colors that lend it its beauty – grey, and blue. The upper part of the body, that is, the wings and the tail display these colors chiefly.

The lower half, that is the breast and the underbelly look white. The white is not very bright though. There is a new color that adds a surprise element here. The sides of the bird carry a hint of peach.

Most of the face of this bird is colored in a way that matches the body. The color of the upper part of the face is very similar to the silvery blue color of the body. 

The chin and the cheek are, by contrast, white. Since this white area is close to the eye, it continues towards the eyes and forms a beautiful white outline for the eyes.

The bill of this bird is curved and is not very big. It is black in color. In addition to all this, if you are looking to identify the bird, look for the black mark just over the bill.

Size: 

This bird is about 5.5 to 6.3 inches long. The wingspan is around 7.9 to 10.2 inches.

Habitat: 

Among the different types of forests, this bird is very fond of living in deciduous forests. However, we are lucky that they are not bashful and readily visit our parks and backyards. If they did not, we would miss adoring such a beautiful bird! So, if you are a backyard feeder, make sure there is some food that tempts them too.

Diet: 

If you want to be sure of attracting these beauties, the best bet is to mix in suet, peanuts, and black oil sunflower seeds. Leave this out for them and watch them come.

American Robin – Turdus migratorius

Coloration and Markings: 

The upper and lower parts of this bird’s body are clearly divided by the colors that they have. This adds greatly to their good looks and also helps us recognize them instantly. What are the colors and how do they demarcate the two halves of the body?

The upper part of the body that comprises the wings and the tail is an attractive grey-brown. This also has little white on the border. The lower half that is made of the breast and underbelly are covered by an impressive orange. There is a touch of white also in this portion. This starts near the rump and goes on till the end of the tail feathers.

The face is of the same grey-brown as the body but is a much deeper shade. The eyes are highlighted by a white line around them. The bill, which is not very long, is mildly curved and is yellow in color.

Size: 

This bird is about 7.9 inches long. The wingspan is around 12.2 to 15.8 inches.

Habitat: 

These birds like to live in the wild and in urban areas too. They are seen regularly in pastures, parks, golf courses, and backyards also. So, if you know how to attract them, you will see them in your backyard.

Diet: 

These birds love to feast on fruits and insects. Use food like dried mealworms, raisins, fruit seeds, and broken peanuts to get them to visit you.

Downy Woodpecker – Picoides pubescens

Coloration and Markings: 

Downy Woodpeckers are delightful birds that are a pleasure to look at. They owe all this beauty to the different colors and designs on them. The main colors that play around to create this magic on the bird are black and white.

Their backs are white and this contradicts the wings that are black. The wings have beautiful white patterns on them all over except near the shoulders.

This is the identifying feature that they have and you cannot miss it. The tails of these birds are actually double-colored. On top, they are black whereas the lower half is white.

The underbelly and the breast match the lower half of the tail as they are also white in color.

The white in the breast is not restricted only to that area. It extends to below the bird’s bill. This place is marked by a black line that appears like a mustache.

The bill of the bird is not very long and is black in color. Most other parts of the face are white. There are two black patches on the face.

One is shaped like a mask and the other is shaped like a cap on top of its head. The males are distinguished from the females by the little red mark that is situated behind the head.

Size: 

This bird is about 5.5 to 6.7 inches long. The wingspan is around 9.8 to 11.8 inches.

Habitat: 

These birds do like to spend time in the wild in forests. However, they do not stick only to these places. They are also seen searching for food on the ground. If you are a backyard feeder, there is good news for you. They do visit feeders also.

Diet: 

These birds love black oil sunflower, peanuts and suet. So, if you are looking to attract them to your yard, offer them all these in your feeder.

Mourning Dove – Zenaida macroura

Coloration and Markings: 

These birds are mostly grey and tan. Other than this, the wings are a little mottled with some black dots. The wings have a little bit of white at the edge of the feathers. This is seen in the feathers of their tails that are long. The lower portion of the body, that is, the underbelly and the breast is of a uniform color. They are a tan color. The color of the head matches the color of the lower portion of the body and it is completely tan. The only different color is the white color that borders the eye. The bill of the bird is not long, is straight, and black.

Size: 

These birds are about 9.1 to 13.4 inches long. The wingspan is around 17.7 inches.

Habitat:

These birds have a very different liking for their habitat. They love being in areas that are populated. In fact, to do this, they go to the extent of avoiding the wild forests. So, if you want to catch sight of them, search in telephone poles and fields. You can also wait for them in your own garden for they visit gardens also.

Diet: 

Food that these birds love includes millet, cracked corn, wheat, and black sunflower seeds. Offer them this favorite food for them to visit you.

Spring, Summer, Early Fall Birds of Pennsylvania

Contrary to the birds that are found all year long, there are some birds that are seen only in some seasons. There are some birds that fall under this category in Pennsylvania. These birds are around in spring, summer, and early fall. This is the season that makes the whole of plant life in Pennsylvania spring to life and the birds use it to their best advantage. Along with enjoying these seasons, you can also enjoy looking at the following birds in this season:

  • Gray-cheeked Thrush
  • Blackpoll Warbler
  • Cedar Waxwing
  • Wood Thrush
  • Northern Flicker

Gray-cheeked Thrush – Catharus minimus

Coloration and Markings: 

The main colors of this bird are brown and grey. The upper part of the body, that is, the wings and the tails are grey or brown. The lower part of the body, that is the breast and underbelly also match these colors in a way. The top portion of the breast has a grey color and tan. There are some spots on it that continue all the way up to the cheeks. The other portions of the lower part of the body are grey.  The color of the bird’s face is in harmony with the color of the rest of the body. The bill of the bird is a bright yellow.

Size: 

This bird is about 6.7 inches long. The wingspan is around 12.6to 13.4 inches.

Habitat: 

These are really bashful birds and are not seen so easily. They remain concealed in the midst of a lot of greenery or well into the woods or in their periphery.

Diet: 

They are insect eaters by design. So, giving them meal worms might bring them in. However, this is not the only thing that they come for. They could also visit your garden if you have shrubs and fruit vines growing.

Blackpoll Warbler – Setophaga striata

Coloration and Markings: 

These attractive birds owe their beauty to the streaks that adorn their bodies all over. Though they are mostly black and white, there is a little brown also. Their backs, tails, and upper portion of the wings have streaks that are colored black and white. The lower half of the wing is a completely different color. It is brown. The streaking continues into the area of the breast and underbelly which are both white.

The face of this bird is also the same color combination – black and white. These two colors clearly demarcate the top and lower portions of the head. The upper portion is black and the lower half is white. This continues until the black line resembles a mustache. The bill of the bird is long and has a mild curve to it. It is yellow in color. The color of the bird undergoes a change in summer. The markings remain the same. However, the color changes to a greenish yellow.

Size: 

These birds are about 5.5 inches long. The wingspan is around 8.3 to 9.1 inches.

Habitat: 

They are most comfortable living in evergreen and deciduous forests. However, if they feel that your feeder has something tempting, they might come home.

Diet: 

Give them their favorite mealworms, suet, and a variety of berries to bring them into your own yard. If your garden has berry vines growing in it, then there is more hope that they will visit you.

Cedar Waxwing – Bombycilla cedrorum

Coloration and Markings: 

This is a colorful bird that is amazing to look at. It has wings and a tail that is grey in color. The ends of the tail are yellow. The underbelly and breast are two different colors. The underbelly is yellow. However, closer to the rump, the yellow is replaced by white. The breast is a tan color. It has a characteristic brown design that continues up to the face and resembles a beard.

The face is a lovely shade of brown. The conspicuous crest adds a lot of beauty to the face.  There is also a deep black patch that covers the eyes and looks like a mask. This is bordered by white that contrasts the white beautifully. The bill is short and sturdy. It is mildly curved and black in color.

Size: 

These birds are about 5.5 to 6.7 inches long. The wingspan is around 6.7 to 11.8 inches.

Habitat: 

These are birds that are most comfortable in the wild. However, they love coming to orchards and gardens. They are not at all bashful and will come if you offer them fruits.

Diet: 

Not having fruit trees in your garden is not at all a problem. Even cut fruit left out for them will bring them in.

Wood Thrush – Hylocichla mustelina

Coloration and Markings: 

The main colors of this bird are reddish brown and white. The upper part of the body, the wings, and the tail are reddish browns. The edges have a little bit of white also. The breast and underbelly are white which is mottled with black. However, closer to the underbelly, the number of spots reduces. 

The face also has many colors. The chin is white and mottled. The white face has grey lines on it. The top of the head is a reddish brown and is shaped like a cap. There is a line around the eye that is not very thick. The size of the bill is average and is yellow in color.

Size: 

These birds are about 7.5 to 8.3 inches. The wingspan is around 11.8 to 13.4 inches.

Habitat: 

These birds generally rely on deciduous forests to live in. They do leave the forest for other places at times. This happens mostly in the colder seasons.

Diet: 

These birds do not come to feeders so easily. But, if your feeder is lower in height and closer to the ground, and if it is filled with hulled black oil sunflower seeds, then you might get to see them.

Northern Flicker – Colaptes auratus

Coloration and Markings: 

The main color of this beautiful bird is brown. With this brown in the background, this bird has a lot of black spots on the back and the wings. The breast and the underbelly are also matching and are the same. The lower part of the wings and the tail are of a completely different shade. They are either orange or yellow. Right on top of the breast is a characteristic crescent shape that is black in color.

The face of this bird is equally beautiful. The same brownish color is seen on the face also. The throat is a shade of grey. There are two different colored streaks present. One is a red streak and the other, is black. The top of the head has a brown patch that looks like a cap. The long bill is black in color and is curved.

Size: 

These birds are about 11 to 12.2 inches long. The wingspan is around 16.5 to 20 inches.

Habitat: 

These birds love living out in the wild. They like areas that are not hidden or enclosed. So, they are seen often in parks and the fringes of woodlands. If your backyard suits what they need – that is a lot of free space, then they will come home too.

Diet: 

These birds love to feast on peanut, suet, black oil sunflower seeds and a variety of dry fruits also. So, choose the items on this list to offer them if you want to see them in your own backyard.

Pennsylvania’s Fall and Winter Birds

Among the different birds we see around us, some are in the habit of migrating to avoid extra cold seasons. The others, however, manage to live where they are comfortable. So, even in the cold season, you can still hope to catch a glimpse of birds that still stay where they are. The following list is about birds that we can spot even during fall and winter.

  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Purple Finch
  • Northern Cardinal

Black-capped Chickadee – Poecile atricapillus

Coloration and Markings: 

The play of different colors like black, grey, and white give this bird its enviable appearance. The upper part of the body, that is the back, wings, and tail of the bird are a smooth grey. The lower part of the body, that is the breast and underbelly are a complete contrast. They are colored a pristine white.

The face has a characteristic pattern that makes it easy to identify. The lower part of the face comprising of the chin and the throat are jet black. Then there is the important part of the face that goes to the name of this bird – the black cap. This black patch that looks so much like a cap is right on top of the head. The patch starts close to the short bill that is cone-shaped. It extends all the way to just below the eye and to the back of the head. Between the lower and upper parts of the face is the central portion that is completely white. This white part is sandwiched on both sides by black.

Size: 

These birds are about 4.7 to 5.9 inches long. The wingspan is around 6.3 to 8.3 inches.

Habitat: 

Though these birds are very fond of trees and a lot of greenery, there are some trees that are bound to attract them more than the others. These are the Birch and Alder trees. They head towards these trees because they are in the habit of nesting in these trees. So, you could have thickets, shrubs, Birch trees or Alder trees to attract them.

Diet: 

These birds savor black oil sunflower seeds, suet, and peanuts. So, offering them these foods will surely get them into your yard.

Hairy Woodpecker – Dryobates villosus

Coloration and Markings: 

It is hard to believe that just two colors namely black and white weave such a magical appearance that this bird boasts of. The back and wings are basically black. They have uniform designs in white on them. The lower portion of the body, the breast, and the underbelly is a complete contrast to the jet black in the upper portion. The charming face is also a mix of two colors black and white. The face is basically white. They have a distinct mask shaped black patch right on top of the head. Just below the mask is a striking reddish orange spot which is a complete contrast to the other two colors. It is to be noted that this spot is characteristic of males only. Their bills are big, black, and curved mildly upward.

Size: 

These birds are about 7.1 to 10.2 inches long. The wingspan is around 13 to 16 inches.

Habitat:

They love to frolic in wild areas like far down into the woods. However, they are also seen in the periphery of forests, parks and suburban areas also.

Diet: 

These birds relish peanuts, suet and black oil sunflower seeds with a lot of zest. So, offer them this in the feeder and enjoy admiring them at close quarters.

Dark-eyed Junco – Junco hyemalis

Coloration and Markings: 

These birds are a combination of dark grey or brown and white. The brown or grey is usually present in the upper portion of the body that is in the wings and tail. The lower half of the bird is mostly white with the exception of the top area of the breast. This is completely grey. The lower portion of the tail feathers are also white. There is a general demarcation of the upper and the lower portions of the body based on the color. The upper portion is grey while most of the lower half is white.

The face matches the color of the upper portion of the body and is grey or brown. The bill is cone-shaped and short. It is pink in color.

Size: 

These birds are not very big and are about 5.5 to 6.3 inches long. The wingspan is around 7.1 to 9.8 inches.

Habitat: 

They love to spend time in coniferous forests in the wild. However, they are seen in parks, fields, and backyards also looking for food.

Diet: 

A major portion of their diet is made up of insects. However, they also love berries once in a while. So, if you want them in your yard, offer them a variety of berries and some dry fruits also in their feeders. This will tempt them to come in.

Purple Finch – Haemorhous purpureus

Coloration and Markings: 

In many of the bird species we know, the males are the luckier ones for they get to look a lot more attractive than the females. The Purple Finch is also one such bird. The male is a stunning combination of striking colors that give it its beauty. To start with, the wings are a harmonious blend of brown and pink. This color dwindles a little towards the tail. The lower half of the body, that is the breast and belly are basically white in color. They bear splotches and streaks of an appealing mix of raspberry and pink colors.

The main color of the face is pink. There is a mask shaped dark raspberry patch and also a mustache line on the face. The top of the head also has a dark raspberry patch.

Their bills are not very long or very short. They are sturdy bills that are grey in color. At times, we also see a black splotch in the upper portion of the bill. This is, however, not present always.

So, how are the females of this species different? They lack the raspberry purple shades. Instead, they have more brown. They also have a characteristic line on the throat. There are also eye stripes that are off-white in color.

Size: 

These awesome birds are not very big. They are about 4.7 to 6.3 inches long. The wingspan is around 8.7 to 10.2 inches.

Habitat: 

Coniferous and deciduous forests are home to this bird in the wild. They are occasionally seen in the periphery of forests or also in places with a lot of greenery with shrubs. Since they are not very bashful, if you offer them what they like to eat, they will visit your backyard.

Diet:

The food that ranks high in priority with these birds is black oil sunflower seeds. So, offering them this in their feeders is a good idea.

Northern Cardinal – Cardinalis cardinalis

Coloration and Markings: 

The splash of a breathtakingly magnificent red all over this bird’s body makes it incredibly attractive and easy to recognize. Apart from this bright red, they have some black that borders the feathers of the wings and tail. There is a black area on the face that resembles a mask. The other portions of the face are the same red. They have an impressive crest also in the same bright red.

The females also look beautiful but they display different colors. They are light brown. They have a hint of red also. The bill is the same for both genders. It is sturdy, cone-shaped, and orange in color.

Size: 

These birds are about 8.3 to 9.3 inches long. The wingspan is around 9.8 to 12.2 inches.

Habitat: 

These birds normally are seen in the periphery of forests. However, they more than willingly come into parks and urban areas also. Since they are fearless, they will come to your feeder without hesitation. The condition is that the feeder should have what they like to eat.

Diet: 

They are not at all fussy about food. They enjoy a variety of food. They like peanuts, suet, and millet. Their favorite of the lot is black oil sunflower seeds.

Other Backyard Birds of Pennsylvania That are Common

What you read until now must have made you more enthusiastic about attracting these birds home. But wait. The list is not over yet. There are still 5 more gorgeous birds that you can bring into your own backyard. The additional surprise is that these birds can be seen all around the year. Here is the list of those 5 beauties:

  • Blue Jay
  • American Goldfinch
  • European Starling
  • Gray Catbird
  • House Finch

Blue Jay – Cyanocitta cristata

Coloration and Markings: 

The beauty of this bird is pure magic created by the right combination of scintillating blue, white and black. This stunning look of theirs makes it so easy to recognize them. The upper part of the body which is the back and the wings are predominantly blue and are highlighted by white and black markings. The tail is made distinct by the squarish blue marks that are bordered by black. The lower portion of the body, that is the breast and the underbelly are white with mild hints of grey.

There is a black line that seems to separate the face from the rest of the body. This starts at the crest which is also blue. It extends all the way up to the other side. The face is a contrasting white and the bill is black. The bill is straight and long also. There is also a small patch over the eye that looks like a mask. This mask is differently designed compared to the mask that we regularly see on birds. It is a dainty design and not the usual banded line that we see in other birds.

Size: 

These birds are comparable to robins in size. They are about 9.8 to 11.8 inches long. The wingspan is around 13.4 to 16.9 inches.

Habitat: 

They are more used to the city than to the wild. They are seen in town very often. When they are not here, they are in the periphery of the forest and their favorite tree is the Oak tree. They are not at all bashful and come for the feeder without hesitation. So, you can enjoy the beauty of this bird frequently.

Diet: 

They fancy eating suet, peanuts and black oil sunflower seeds. So, these are enough to lure the birds into the yard.

American Goldfinch – Spinus tristis

Coloration and Markings: 

These birds are an amazing combination of bright yellow, jet black, and white. These characteristic features make it very easy to recognize this bird. The males have backs that are brilliant yellow. This is contrasted by wings that are deep black. These wings are made more beautiful by the conspicuous white wingbars. There are also additional white vertical lines that run down the wings to the tail. The lower part of the body, that is the breast and the underbelly are a vivid yellow. There is a white near the rump.

Their faces are also yellow. There is a black patch on top of the head which looks like a cap. This continues from the forehead to the bill. The bill is cone-shaped and is orange in color. The females are not as brightly colored as the males. Their caps are olive in color. In winter, there is a drastic change in the appearance of both genders. They molt and the brightly attractive colors disappear. They are replaced by an ordinary brown. However, the wingbars are still conspicuous.

Size: 

These birds are about 4.3 to 5.1 inches long. The wingspan is around 7.5 to 8.7 inches.

Habitat: 

These birds are most comfortable in fields and any place with a lot of greenery. They are also spotted in gardens, orchards and backyards. The backyards should have full feeders.

Diet: 

It is not at all difficult to bring these birds into your yard. All you need to do is offer them Nyjer and black oil sunflower seeds in their feeders.

European Starling – Sturnus vulgaris

Coloration and Markings: 

The feathers of this bird are dazzling green and purple. Their long and straight bill is a complete contrast as it is yellow in color.  In the colder months, these birds molt, and their color undergoes a radical change. The feathers become brown. They are mottled with white.

Size: 

These birds are average in size. They are about 7.9 to 9.1 inches long. The wingspan is around 12.2 to 15.8 inches.

Habitat: 

They are bold birds that are not at all bashful. As a result, they are more comfortable with the town and country. Watch out for them on the sidewalks busy searching for food. They are also regularly spotted on telephone poles.

Diet: 

They are not at all fussy about food but their favorite is grains. All you need is wheat and oats to lure these birds in.

Gray Catbird – Dumetella carolinensis

Coloration and Markings: 

These birds have a lovely shade of grey all over their bodies. With not too many colors, this bird looks lovely in grey. The tail itself is also grey or black but the lower side of the tail has a surprise element – an elegant orange brown near the rump.

The face is also the same grey as the body. However, there is a half-mask stripe on the face. The bill has a mild curve.

Size: 

These birds are about 8.3 to 9.4 inches long. The wingspan is around 8.7 to 11.8 inches.

Habitat: 

Places with a lot of greenery like shrubs, thickets, and vines are the best spots for this bird.

Diet: 

Fruits rank very high in the priority list of these birds. If your garden has fruit trees, they will definitely come. But, even if there are no fruit trees, all you need to do is offer them cut apples or other fruits, raisins, and dried apricots.

House Finch – Haemorhous mexicanus

Coloration and Markings: 

The males are the more colorful and attractive of the two genders. The back is a deep grey or brown. There are stripes on the wings and tails. The lower half of the breast is very differently colored. This area is white and grey with areas that are a lovely rosy red. These areas increase in number and the upper portion of the breast is completely this color. The red rump is visible when the bird is in flight.

The face is also the same attractive red. There is a grey area that resembles a mask but it is not very big. Though the bill is not very big, it is very sturdy. It is silver in color. The females are not as brightly colored as they do not have the vivid red in the males. Instead, they are grey and brown.

Size

These birds are about 5.1 to 5.5 inches long. The wingspan is around 7.9 to 9.8 inches.

Habitat: 

The urban areas are not anything new to this little bird. They are regulars at farms, parks, and backyards. However, they are seen at the periphery of forests.

Diet: 

These birds enjoy eating black oil sunflower seeds. It is a good idea to offer them these but offer them the smaller seeds. If you have the bigger ones, breaking them up is a good idea.

What do Birds of Pennsylvania Eat?

If you are wondering what to offer these birds to eat, then, we have some ready information here for you. The following list will be very useful for you to decide what to fill your feeders with:

  • Black Oil Sunflower
  • Peanuts and/or peanut butter
  • Cracked and ear corn
  • White Proso millet
  • Suet

Pennsylvania Birding Active Spots

If you are not too sure about where to look to find these beautiful birds in Pennsylvania, we have that also covered. The following list tells you where exactly to search for them:

  • Northern hotspot – Susquehannock State Forest
  • Eastern hotspot – Delaware Water Gap Hawk Lookout
  • Southern hotspot – Gettysburg Battlefield
  • Western hotspot – Moraine State Park
  • Central hotspot – Bald Eagle State Park

Conclusion

This article gives you all that you need to know about the backyard birds of Pennsylvania. It is very interesting and rewarding to attract these gorgeous beauties to your own backyard. But, the process may, at times, take some time to materialize. Though you must be so eager to see the birds at close quarters, patience is an important virtue if you want to be successful. Another important thing to remember is that the feeders should have abundant food that the birds like.

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